Award category: Accessible Product

This award recognises an organisation or individual that has developed a product or service with disability inclusion at its heart. This category spotlights products and brands that use accessible design to improve the lives of disabled people.

Winner

Nominees in this award category

Ability Bow

A power chair user smiles while using exercise equipment in the Ability Bow gym. A member of the Ability Bow team stands behind them.

Ability Bow

Ability Bow makes exercise accessible. With its fully equipped community gym and experienced, qualified instructors, it tailors exercise support for disabled people. Members can use specialist equipment and join in with one-to-one sessions and small groups.

Ability Bow’s team and trustees have lived experience of disability and caring, which informs their efforts to make the gym welcoming. By making exercise possible and enjoyable, Ability Bow helps disabled people enjoy the mental and physical health benefits that come with regular activity.

DEWEY

Two models of short stature walk down a catwalk in a DEWEY fashion show.

DEWEY

Wearing clothes that fit well instils confidence and self-assurance. Yet stylish choices are limited for shorter people. DEWEY was founded by Chamiah Dewey to address this gap in the fashion industry. It designs and produces tailored clothing for people under 4’11”.

The company partners with experts in business, charity professionals and disabled people. By listening to lived experience it gains valuable insights that inform DEWEY designs. The end result is clothes that are high quality, functional and stylish.

LEGO Braille Bricks

A young boy playing with LEGO Braille Bricks.

LEGO Braille Bricks

LEGO Braille Bricks have both braille and printed letters, numbers and symbols on each brick. Since 2020, the LEGO Foundation has distributed the bricks free to organisations specialising in the education of children with vision impairment. Then in 2023 the LEGO Group made LEGO Braille Bricks available to the public.

Play is one of the best ways for children to learn and it helps families bond. LEGO Braille Bricks make learning braille more fun and accessible to the whole family.

Neo-Walk

Lyndsay Watterson sits in a chair, displaying her pink Neo-Walk walking stick.

Neo-Walk

Neo Walk is the home of beautiful handmade acrylic walking sticks. Neo-Walk was founded by Lyndsay Watterson. She is proud of her success as a disabled, female entrepreneur. Neo-Walk’s customers have formed a large community on Instagram. They take pride in showing off their Neo-Walk sticks.

The sticks are customisable with colours, grips, straps and length extenders. The sticks have been used on the red carpet by Hollywood stars like Christina Applegate and Selma Blair.

WheelieQueer

A colourful graphic featuring photos of the WheelieQueer team. Beneath each team member's photo is their name, pronouns, sign name and job title. One of the 'team members' is a cat called Luna who is the 'Pawsonal Assistant'.

WheelieQueer

WheelieQueer is a LGBTQ+, Deaf and disability-led small business. It offers a benefits advice service, helping disabled people access benefits like PIP. All benefits advisers are fluent in BSL and spoken English.

Over a year, WheelieQueer supported 89 clients with PIP claims. At either new claim, review or appeal stages. All claims were successful and appeals at tribunal received a higher rate. WheelieQueer also creates accessible resources, facilitates workshops and provides support to groups. They highlight the importance of being inclusive.

Judges of this award category